Limericks

10 hours ago

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

MATT ROMOSER: Hi, this is Matt from Springfield, Mass.

SAGAL: Oh, what do you do there in Springfield?

ROMOSER: I am a professor of industrial engineering at Western New England University.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

10 hours ago

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now onto our final game - Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer is worth two points.

Bill, can you give us the scores?

Predictions

10 hours ago

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, who will be the next video game character to make the headlines? Adam Burke.

ADAM BURKE: It will be when Namco reveals that Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man are the same person, and they were just way ahead of this whole gender fluidity thing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Faith Salie.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Student loan forgiveness applicants largely denied

On India's west coast, revelers hoist up statues of an elephant-headed god, and parade them toward the Arabian Sea. They sing and chant, and hand out food to bystanders.

For 10 days, they perform pooja — Hindu prayers — at the statues' feet and then submerge them in bodies of water.

This is a tradition in Mumbai, India's biggest city, near the end of each year's monsoon rains: a festival honoring Ganesh, or Lord Ganesha, the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck. He has a human body and an elephant head.

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