All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 4 to 6:30pm

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour and 30 minutes show is hosted by Mary Louis Kelly, Ari Shapiro, Audie Cornish and Ailsa Chang.

Ways to Connect

John High has diabetes, which led to his leg being amputated below the knee two years ago. He's been using a wheelchair since then, and hasn't gotten used to having to work out solutions to everyday problems — such as getting in and out of the shower in the small rental house he shares with his son in Norman, Okla. But when he hears a tornado siren blaring out its high-pitched warning he feels a spasm of fear and dread. In this situation, he's on his own.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Pages